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Twas a cold winter evening,

In Chicagoland,

On the way to the Auditorium theatre,

For a performance quite grand.

 

The guests took their seats,

The stage decked in splendor,

Anxiously awaiting their journey,

Expecting ballerinas so tender.

 

Then up went the music,

And down went the lights,

As we were whisked away

To the Nutcracker that night.

Joffrey Nutcracker - Rory Hohenstein  Christine Rocas photo by Herbert Migdoll

All know the story,

The Nutcracker’s tale,

From the grand ball to the Sugar Plum Fairy,

Danced by a young Mikhail (Barishnikov ;-) )

 

The Joffrey performed the ballet,

With intricate care,

To keep with traditions,

So all ages could share.

Joffrey Nutcracker - Jeraldine Mendoza photo by Herbert Migdoll

Spanish Chocolate, Arabian Coffee,

Chinese Tea and Russian Candy,

Danish Marzipan, Mother Ginger,

It was all just dandy!

 

But the waltz of the snowflakes

And the waltz of the flowers,

Is where this ballet

Holds all of its power.

 

The dancers on pointe,

In their tutus and tights,

Twirling and leaping,

Twas a majestic sight.

 

The Joffrey Ballet is performing,

A holiday tale to remember,

For all to enjoy,

While it runs through December.

Joffrey Nutcracker - Dylan Gutierrez and April Daly photo by Herbert Migdoll

So off to The Joffrey!

Don’t miss it this year,

Fill up your holiday,

With Nutcracker cheer!

Published in Theatre Reviews
Monday, 02 December 2013 08:34

Arcade Fire

 

One of the millennium's most influential independent music groups have launched a series of uncompromising hits that bring music back to where it always tries to be.

Conceived in early 2000, and opening for U2 nearly 5 years later, Arcade Fire has ignited something very important in the music scene.

It's a feeling music has been missing for nearly two decades on so many levels. They make music the way they want to, even more so than the idols who have influenced them so much. Their major breakthrough album 'The Suburbs' , with the stand-out track "Ready To Start", a follow-up to Neon Bible and Funeral, landed them all over the media. It also reflected a serious side to their expressionism that shows how driven by emotion their songs are.

Both Neon Bible and Funeral carry darker tones influenced by several family member deaths during writing, as well as bigger world topics hanging over them.

Regine Chassagne, multi-instrumentalist, wrote a song ( title 'Haiti' ) influenced by events

in Haiti. Her parents lived there

until political atmosphere drove them to sanctuary in Canada, where Regine joined Arcade Fire.

Arcade Fire would eventually raise relief money for Haitians, something close to U2

and other celebrities.

They would ultimately open for U2 on tour, and their current album is successively full of, and influenced by, Haitian percussives.

The Suburbs was conceived when lead singer Win Butler received a photo of his friend holding his daughter. The image made Win start thinking about what happened to where he grew up, which lead to a reflective pursuit of growth and maturity as well as revisiting the places that resided inside.

The first release of their most recent album, Reflektor, can be seen below.

Click the album pack 02 for their site to download and purchase:

After watching the video below ( in the media portion ) come back up and click Downtown enter your childhood address, and press play.

 

REFLEKTOR

arcade-fire

 

 

Published in BuzzBlog

So many great bands emerged in the 1960’s and you couldn’t make a list of honorees without including The Rascals. In Steven and Maureen Van Zandt’s presentation of “Once Upon A Dream” we not only learn about one of the most influential bands of that era, we also get to see the New Jersey legends perform. “Once Upon A Dream” starring The Rascals made its way to Chicago stopping off at the Cadillac Palace for a five show stint.  

In “Once Upon A Dream”, The Rascals, formerly known as The Young Rascals, intertwine live song performances with storytelling that explains how the band formed, their survival throughout the British Invasion, their support for Civil Rights as well as many funny anecdotes that took place during their years as a band. Told either by live band members on stage or via recorded images on a giant screen, each story is nicely complemented by The Rascals performing a song that relates.

An inspiring set of classics by The Rascals is played throughout the show including such greats as “Groovin’”, “Good Lovin’”, “Beautiful Morning”, “I’ve Been Away Too Long” and their highly charged, Civil Rights anthem “People Got To Be Free”. Feel like taking a few pictures? Well, that’s just fine by The Rascals who, at the show’s beginning, invite the audience to take out their cameras and shoot away then suggest posting pictures on Twitter and Facebook.     

What you get here is an entertaining story and a live concert rolled into one. The Rascals also show that they are as musically sharp as they were back in their heyday. It’s nearly impossible not to be entertained by this show Rascals fan or not. As the show goes on, audience members let loose to the music more and more, perhaps timid at first since they are at the “theatre”. That said, by the end of the show people are standing and clapping along with each song, crowding the aisles and shouting out to the stage. My hope is that we may see other bands from the past doing show similar to this one in the future. Perhaps The Rascals will prove to be pioneers in such a field.

“Once Upon A Dream” is a truly unique theatre experience. For more information on this wonderfully refreshing show, visit  http://rascalsdream.com/.

Published in In Concert
Thursday, 07 November 2013 02:54

Lots of Seoul: Love X Stereo Plays Chicago

With the recent influx of K-Pop entering the US in the past few years (Gangnam Style anyone?), it's critical to remember that other music does in fact come out of South Korea. One band in particular is currently on their US tour and should they swing back through Chicago, they are definitely worth seeing live.

Lovex

Love X Stereo performed at the Elbo Room on November 3rd to a shockingly small crowd that didn't appreciate them as they should. Love X Stereo is an electronic rock band based in Seoul, Korea. Love X Stereo’s music is electronic music based in alternative and punk rock from the 90s, think Alanis Morissette with a Ratatat-esque synthesized beat. The lead singer of the band, Annie Ko, has a soft and easy voice that could rival any 90's and 80's female powerhouse. Their song "Soul City (Soeul City)" sounds like it could soundtrack any modern day "Dawson's Creek," while "Lose to Win" and "Fly Over" highlights Ko's vocal talents.

Electronic rock is definitely coming into popularity and hearing a band from South Korea take the genre and make it entirely their own is an experience you won't find equal to. Not surprisingly, Love X Stereo's music often confuses Korean audiences, though they have a strong expat (foreigners living in Korea) community following, and some of those fans adoringly came to the Elbo Room to see Love X Stereo perform live.

annie

Like any new band, exposure is key. Love X Stereo has a unique sound, an album you can put on and cruise to. If they chance to swing back through Chicago, grab some friends and head to see them. Not every day you get to see a South Korean band playing electronic rock in the Windy City. Check out their website here:

 http://lovexstereo.com/

Published in In Concert
Wednesday, 23 October 2013 00:00

We Will Rock You Leaves Something to be Desired

We Will Rock You is currently being performed in Chicago at the Cadillac Palace for a limited engagement from October 22nd through the 27th. And though the songs are probably enough to keep you entertained for the most part, this production just goes to show that a musical doesn’t always need a well-crafted story anymore as long as there is a demand for the music.

In this musical with music by Queen, we are taken to the future to iPlanet where individuality has been stripped and free thinking has become criminal. The story’s hero, “Galileo”, has become a threat to the oppressive government as he receives bits and pieces of rock and roll in his dreams. He soon finds a like-minded girl, “Saramouche” and there adventure to save iPlanet begins. During their mission they come across a band of rebels who live in hiding and worship rock and roll relics and fragments. It’s not long before the iPlanet government led by “Killer Queen” discovers the band of insurgents and the fate of the world falls into “Galileo’s” hands. That about sums it up.   

While the music of Queen is pleasing to the ears and occasionally used with originality in big Vegas-like numbers, we are also subjected to a bevy of contrived one-liners and preposterous situations that fail as campy humor and were instead more along the lines of absurd. Though he carries a legitimate Broadway voice with him, Brian Justin Crum lacks the charisma and rock and roll essence to play such a role as “Galileo”, making it tough to want to cheer for the hero.   

But there is some good in the show, too. Ruby Lewis (“Saramouche”) delivers an astounding vocal performance, as does Jacqueline B. Arnold as the no-nonsense and sassy “Killer Queen”. There are plenty of eye-catching dance numbers that are both sexy and fun, and the band is occasionally visible, which adds a concert-like feel to the show. And let’s not forget that We Will Rock You is one Queen song after another with great selections such as “Somebody to Love”, “Under Pressure” and “We Will Rock You” before an entire cast finale of “Bohemian Rhapsody”.    

In a nutshell, the show is entertaining enough with its dance numbers and the music of queen and though most of the laughs are predictable, there are still a few good hoots that will catch you by surprise. Disappointing is the lack of story writer Ben Elton could manage with all that great music at his disposal.

For more information on We Will Rock You, visit www.BroadwayinChicago.org.   

Published in Theatre Reviews
Sunday, 22 September 2013 00:00

Evita Returns To Chicago With A Bang

The national tour of Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Evita” is currently playing in Chicago through October 6th. Complete with a Tony worthy cast, this production of “Evita” stirs the souls of audience members throughout. The show is well directed by Tony and Oliver winner Michael Grandage and the dazzling dance performances can be chalked up to the choreography of the talented Rob Ashford, also the recipient of a Tony Award.

“Evita” is the story of Eva Peron who became Argentina’s First Lady in 1946 and remained so until her death in 1952. Married to Argentinian President Juan Peron, Eva was the country’s ambassador and became a true inspiration for its people. Hers is truly a story of rags to riches coming from one of the poorest areas of Junin before fleeing with a musician to Buenos Aires years later where her good looks contributed to her becoming a successful actress. In 1944 Eva Duarte met Colonel Juan Peron at a fundraising benefit for a major San Juan earthquake that claimed over 10,000 lives.

Caroline Bowman is triumphant as “Eva Peron”. Bowman delivers a stunning performance that is sure to be remembered long after. For any production of “Evita” to succeed there needs to be a strong “Che” and Josh Morgan exceeded expectations with both his charisma and talented voice. Sean MacLaughlin also turns in a credible performance as “Juan Peron”. The set is impressive, the dancing and music enthralling and story engaging – everything a brilliant musical needs.

“Evita” is playing at the Oriental Theatre located at 24 W Randolph. For more information and/or tickets visit www.BroadwayinChicago.com or call 800-775-2000.        

Published in Theatre Reviews

There is just something about the ballet; the people watching (it’s a very entertaining crowd), the glass of bubbly before the show starts, the curtain rising, the live orchestra playing, and of course the ballet dancers that make the most difficult of feats seem effortless. Unfortunately, like previous performances I’ve seen at the Joffrey, the most recent performance of “Othello” left me wanting more.

Joffrey - Othello - Fabrice Calmels  April Daly 1 photo by Herbert Migdoll

Once again, Joffrey loyalists will roll their eyes when I tell them I was disappointed by the “Othello” performance. This was a completely original ballet based off of a great Shakespearean tragedy and it should have been amazing. The short teaser trailer of the performance on the Joffrey’s website was dramatic and foreboding. On the other hand, as the show began, I knew immediately that I would be left wanting. Let me first say that the dancing was beautiful. The main dancers, Othello played by Fabrice Calmels and Desdemona played by April Daly, were graceful, strong, and fluid, and exactly what you’d expect in the principal dancers. Sadly, great dancers can only do so much with what they are given, and I don’t think they were learnt much in the ways of choreography and music. The music alone was enough to make someone dislike the show. Imagine an entire 2 hour performance with drums and strings building and building and taking forever to reach a crescendo and when it does nothing happens on stage to match the power behind those notes. I equate it to sitting in a scary movie, the music building your expectations to a state of uncontrollable suspense, just waiting for the killer to jump out and attack, only to have the loud crash usually tied to a scary moment to be someone yawning on screen. What a letdown, right?

Joffrey - Othello - Matthew Adamczyk as Iago photo by Herbert Migdoll

Also, the choreography was a bit too in-your-face-foreshadowing of the tumultuous and ultimately grim lover’s tale. If you went through high school and college never having read Othello or seeing the movie O, then perhaps the references weren’t so easy to pick up on, but for those of us who know the story it was about as blunt as an axe to the head. At times the duets between Othello and Desdemona just consisted of him lifting her and tossing her around like a gracefully beautiful sack of potatoes, his hands and arms lingering around her neck for an awkwardly long time. Outside of those dancers, the solos of Cassio and Iago, played by Aaron Rogers and Matthew Adamcyzk respectfully, were beautiful, but the jealousy that eventually drives Iago to his dastardly acts was so jagged and rough that it took away from the grace of a great dancer. The character of Iago seethes with jealousy, hatred, and envy but it didn’t translate as powerfully as it could have in the dancing and he ended up looking like a petulant child. All in all, the entire ballet performance was lukewarm for such a heated storyline.

Joffrey - Othello - Fabrice Calmels  April Daly 3 photo by Herbert Migdoll

So why go back? Why keep going to the ballet if I’m not going to enjoy it? It’s because I believe in this art and want to be blown away each and every time. Some of the dance companies in Chicago without nearly the endowment the Joffrey has, have left me speechless and simply blown away by their performances. I suppose I just expect the same from a company with such amazing talent as the Joffrey. So I will still go, and still hope for a performance that takes my breath away and leaves me saying ‘O.’

Published in Theatre Reviews

I’ve never been to Havana, Cuba. I never even saw Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights. But after seeing the world premiere of River North Dance Chicago and the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic’s performance of “Havana Blue,” Havana is definitely a place that I would hop on a plane and visit in a heartbeat. I am of course basing this decision entirely upon the hope that everyone breaks out into expertly choreographed dances to express emotions and feelings for the city they reside in. Regardless, the premiere of “Havana Blue” was a wonderful and entertaining surprise.

Havana Blue 08 Photo by Cheryl Mann

“Havana Blue” was created and collaborated on by choreographer Frank Chaves and jazz trumpeter Orbert Davis. They traveled the streets of Cuba, immersing themselves into the culture, the nightlife, exploring the country’s musical routes. What they came back with was a beautiful ensemble that celebrates the life and exuberance that is Havana.

Entering the theater and the show, I was far from the most knowledgeable about Jazz or Cuban life and culture. Jazz lovers and dance lovers alike flocked to see “Havana Blue” to make it a nearly sold-out performance, a feat I had never seen at the Auditorium Theater. The crowd was energetic and lively, freely swaying back and forth to the music and even jumping up in the aisles to dance. Everyone in the audience, including my friend who accompanied me, knew when Orbert Davis said ‘Dizzy,’ knew to respond with ‘Gillespie.’ But I soon discovered, when the curtain went up and the music started to play, I didn’t need to know a great deal about the show, or jazz history, to appreciate the art forms performing in front of me.

Havana Blue 04 Photo by Cheryl Mann

The curtains rose to reveal a brass jazz band, the brass twinkling under the bright stage lights, set against a dark brick wall. It was an impressive sight, and just as visually stunning as the gorgeous dance pairs of River North Dance Chicago that opened the show, the women in flowing blue dresses, the men in sexy-tight pants and open shirts, muy caliente.

“Havana Blue” is comprised of a several sultry and powerful dance segments, each representing a mood that you could find in the life-pulse of the Cuban city. One of the more notable dances was “Solteras" ("Single Ladies"), which many found to be a sad(ish) dance in which one woman was not being coupled up to dance with male partners. But the solo woman did not dance with a dejected rhythm but a “que sera sera” style, retaining a sexiness and comfortableness with dancing alone. Indeed, the women shifted partners, each woman getting a chance to dance solo while the couples danced around them. As the “Solteras” danced, there were smiles on their faces, not longing. I viewed the dance as empowerment for women, not romantic yearning because they weren’t coupled up. The women danced in spite of not having a partner and danced beautifully and strong, not slumped and saddened. (Cue female empowerment music: 'All the solteras, all the solteras,' kidding). Shortly after that performance was another notable dance segment "Lo Masculino" ("The Masculine"). To sum up the performance in one word: steamy. The males of River North Dance Chicago performed shirtless to a powerhouse number filled with masculinity, sweaty six-pack abs, and moves that would have made Baryshnikov proud. It was the perfect blend of power and rhythm that really made "Havana Blue" pop and sizzle.

Havana Blue 05 Photo by Cheryl Mann

“Havana Blue” completely embodied the sensual, powerful, and allure of the Havana culture. The artistic direction of Frank Chaves with River North Dance Chicago and the artistic direction of Orbert Davis was a match made in the streets of Havana. These two men created a show that will surely be enjoyed for years to come. Should you see “Havana Blue” coming to a city near you, or to our very own Chicago again, be sure to samba your way to see this show, you will not be decepcionado.

Published in Theatre Reviews
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